Evolution of My Bench

GaryG64

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Joined
Sep 8, 2022
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How my bench has evolved from 2017 to 2023.
I got back to the hobby in 2017 starting with a nice big B-17G (which is currently on hold). I had a handful of Testors paints and a few rattle cans of spray paint and that was it.
Now I have gotten more serious about the hobby, but I always have fun with it. It is relaxing and relieves stress. There is a lot to keep busy on a model such as;
Researching, Planning, Cutting, Drilling, Sculpting, Sanding, Gluing, Painting, Detailing & Photography.
Also keeping your brain active and challenged is important, as it can lower your risk of dementia at a later stage of your life.
There is a sense of satisfaction when I build a kit and each day it gets closer to completion.
The more I learn something new usually results in the purchase of a new gadget(s).
 

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How my bench has evolved from 2017 to 2023.
I got back to the hobby in 2017 starting with a nice big B-17G (which is currently on hold). I had a handful of Testors paints and a few rattle cans of spray paint and that was it.
Now I have gotten more serious about the hobby, but I always have fun with it. It is relaxing and relieves stress. There is a lot to keep busy on a model such as;
Researching, Planning, Cutting, Drilling, Sculpting, Sanding, Gluing, Painting, Detailing & Photography.
Also keeping your brain active and challenged is important, as it can lower your risk of dementia at a later stage of your life.
There is a sense of satisfaction when I build a kit and each day it gets closer to completion.
The more I learn something new usually results in the purchase of a new gadget(s).
Not Pantherman neat and tidy but definitely getting there, I like it.
 
I think our workspaces are very personal expressions of ourselves. They adapt and change over time, range from "Pantherman Tidy" to "Lord of Chaos Pandemonium", and sometimes grow to encompass an entire room (or rooms).
I am curious about something in that last photo: the little tray attached to the front of the bench and covered in blue tape. Dust collector? Stray part catcher? Paint mixing pallet? Very shallow spittoon?
 
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Nicely put, Greysteele.

My little tray does a fair job at collecting debris, and paint does drip into it now and again. I tried "dipping" Skol in my younger days, until I accidentally swolled a little and felt myself turn green and quite nauseated, which ended my trial at that so not a spittoon.
So yes, it is a foamboard, gouged out trough duct—tape covered parts catcher, which saved many parts.
 
Cool. Somewhere I've seen a tip for not losing parts on a workbench that involved wearing an apron with magnets sewn into the bottom hem. When you sit down, you snap the magnets onto a steel strip under the edge of the workbench, creating a safety net for falling parts and debris. Of course, if I were disciplined enough to remember to put on the apron and attach it to the bench every time I sat down, then I probably wouldn't drop as many pieces in the first place. ;]
 
Cool. Somewhere I've seen a tip for not losing parts on a workbench that involved wearing an apron with magnets sewn into the bottom hem. When you sit down, you snap the magnets onto a steel strip under the edge of the workbench, creating a safety net for falling parts and debris. Of course, if I were disciplined enough to remember to put on the apron and attach it to the bench every time I sat down, then I probably wouldn't drop as many pieces in the first place. ;]
I would probably forget to detach the apron and end up bringing the bench with me when I got up !!!
Pantherman
 
Cool. Somewhere I've seen a tip for not losing parts on a workbench that involved wearing an apron with magnets sewn into the bottom hem. When you sit down, you snap the magnets onto a steel strip under the edge of the workbench, creating a safety net for falling parts and debris. Of course, if I were disciplined enough to remember to put on the apron and attach it to the bench every time I sat down, then I probably wouldn't drop as many pieces in the first place. ;]
I have a bad habit of sitting away from the table where I put my parts catcher. However I have yet to design a safety net for parts that fly into the netherworld of missing parts.
 
Mine started as a bench designed to fit in a small "bedroom" in the mobile home I lived in at the time. And it was designed to recycle materials I had at hand.
That room was about 10x8. So the bench couldn't be too big. It's 8 by about 3, or a little less.
The surface is 4 pieces of 3/4" plywood I scrounged at work (I trained bank staff, and we used a century-old safe as our vault. The plywood made up shelves in that safe. When the bank got rid of the safe, I scavenged the plywood.) And I had some scrap 2x4s for the legs and frame. It's assembled with carriage bolts, mostly, in case I have to move, and then I can strike it.
For many years, I had a little shelf made out of pine stock, standing on the back. That was made to fit my dorm room window when I was in college, and I scavenged it. That stayed that way for around 25 years. Then I added the hutch back. More storage, and more permanent. Though again, it can be struck quickly for transport.
The easel, I spotted in some family's trash. I stopped at the house, confirmed they were throwing it out (I couldn't believe it!) and if I could take it (I have a pickup truck, makes salvage easy). It has proved convenient for holding photos, reference docs, etc.
The shop chair was also salvaged, from a machine shop, and other little bits here and there were added as I needed to add storage or organize things.
It looks like a mess, but my philosophy is "A pile for everything and everything in its pile."
But I started improving my storage, because as I get older, I "lose" things I have bought, mostly figures and model kits. "I know where it is-it's here, in the basement." I want to improve that precision.
 
I forgot to mention that I have a power strip attached under the bench, on the inside of the frame. That provides power for the lamps mounted in the frame, my Dremel, and the soldering iron.
The lamps fit into holes drilled at intervals, to receive their posts. I don't often need to move them around, but if I have to, I can.
I do need to move the strip to the outside of the frame, though. When I lived in a trailer, it was practical to have the strip on the inside. But I'm getting tired of contorting myself to reach underneath.
 
Mine started as a bench designed to fit in a small "bedroom" in the mobile home I lived in at the time. And it was designed to recycle materials I had at hand.
That room was about 10x8. So the bench couldn't be too big. It's 8 by about 3, or a little less.
The surface is 4 pieces of 3/4" plywood I scrounged at work (I trained bank staff, and we used a century-old safe as our vault. The plywood made up shelves in that safe. When the bank got rid of the safe, I scavenged the plywood.) And I had some scrap 2x4s for the legs and frame. It's assembled with carriage bolts, mostly, in case I have to move, and then I can strike it.
For many years, I had a little shelf made out of pine stock, standing on the back. That was made to fit my dorm room window when I was in college, and I scavenged it. That stayed that way for around 25 years. Then I added the hutch back. More storage, and more permanent. Though again, it can be struck quickly for transport.
The easel, I spotted in some family's trash. I stopped at the house, confirmed they were throwing it out (I couldn't believe it!) and if I could take it (I have a pickup truck, makes salvage easy). It has proved convenient for holding photos, reference docs, etc.
The shop chair was also salvaged, from a machine shop, and other little bits here and there were added as I needed to add storage or organize things.
It looks like a mess, but my philosophy is "A pile for everything and everything in its pile."
But I started improving my storage, because as I get older, I "lose" things I have bought, mostly figures and model kits. "I know where it is-it's here, in the basement." I want to improve that precision.
Very resourceful, Brad. Those usually makes the best structures. Yes. The power strip works he goodest on the outside of the table. I'm not as nimble as I was 20 years ago.
About 20 years ago I made a work bench out of scrap wood from the trash pile when our house was being built. I mounted a router table and double wheeled grinder to it. I put casters for easy movement. I think it's about 4' long 2' wide & 3' tall. It is very stout. Now that I don't use the wood working tools anymore I've been selling things off. I just sold my table-saw and my grinder and listed my router, bits, & table to sell.
I wish we had basements here in Houston. But with the hurricanes it would be pointless. I am using a small room I converted to my "cave" which is about 12'x9'. Home to all of my psychology and sociology books, history books, religious references and Bible books, and antique books as well as models.
No matter how big or small we all seem to make it work for us.
 
The bench as it stands today. As my tools and paints increase I evolve with it.

I tried the headlight magnifier. It didn't work for me. I'm happy with my lights and glasses.
 

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The bench as it stands today. As my tools and paints increase I evolve with it.

I tried the headlight magnifier. It didn't work for me. I'm happy with my lights and glasses.
No OCD twitching here which means that you're getting there. I like it. Pantherman
 
The bench as it stands today. As my tools and paints increase I evolve with it.

I tried the headlight magnifier. It didn't work for me. I'm happy with my lights and glasses.
I can see two nail polishing sponges on photos, i use them too, really handy stuff.
 
I like it too, great bench, by the way, apologies but what is "OCD twitching".
OCD is obsessive compulsion disorder, it's the need to put things in an orderly way or place things in the correct place, also correct mistakes.

I have sort of developed it later in life and I seem to be the "go to member " for approval of fellow members work area's.

Basically if I get a bit "twitchy/upset " about a posted photo, it means that it needs tidying up. Just a bit of fun really. Makes me chuckle and if you're a "messy" builder that's fine with me. The main thing is that we all enjoy the hobby however we do it.
Pantherman
 

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