Painting section...HOW TO?!?!

ExodusInside

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Feb 21, 2012
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Two quick questions.... one - how do i strip old paint off plastic without damaging it? ( airbrushed a model, without reading the label that says NOT FOR AIRBRUSHING ), two - my dad says a few of you may or may not know the appropriate thinning ratio for vallejo paints because it's possible to use them for airbrushing ( said paint from first question )

thanks guys!
 

Ravhin

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Aug 21, 2012
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Those paints that say not for airbrushing can be airbrushed and I don't see there any reason to strip the paint. That warning is due to some safety regulation I believe.

As for the thinning ratios I'll let that for someone who has actually airbrushed with them.
 

Elm City Hobbies

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ExodusInside said:
Two quick questions.... one - how do i strip old paint off plastic without damaging it? ( airbrushed a model, without reading the label that says NOT FOR AIRBRUSHING ), two - my dad says a few of you may or may not know the appropriate thinning ratio for vallejo paints because it's possible to use them for airbrushing ( said paint from first question )

thanks guys!

OK, first off, Vallejo Model Air is designed to be used in the airbrush, they are pre-thinned, so it takes the guess work out of having to thin paint to airbrush.

Vallejo Model Color is more designed for hand brushing, but can be thinned to be airbrushed. Yes, some of the bottles do have the warning saying DO NOT AIRBRUSH, but it is only there because those paints will have a bit of Cadmium in them to help create the brilliant hue of the pigment.

The reason Vallejo has those warnings on the bottles, is because they have to have it if they want to sell the paint in the various countries that you will find Vallejo.

As Vallejo dealer, I talk to the guys at Vallejo fairly often (once a month or so) and have talked to them about these warnings, and they basically said what I posted above, that they have to put the warnings on them because of certain materials in the paint. However, there is such a small amount of it in the paint, that you would have to swim in a vat of the paint, and ingest massive amounts of the paint in order for the cadmium to have any ill effect. Something I am sure none of us is doing is swimming in a vat of paint, or adding it to our coffee.

So in the end, don't worry about it, if your kit is already painted with it using an airbrush, well congrats, no need to strip it off, continue on with your kit.

As far as thinning Vallejo Paint, as I said above, the Model Air, is pre-thinned, so no need to thin it, and if you do, literally, a drop or 2 of thinner in a color cup of paint is more than enough.

Thinning the Model Color line couldn't be easier with Vallejo's reformulated Airbrush thinner. 2 to 3 parts thinner to 1 part paint, and you are good to go, couldn't be easier.

The Model washes are just that, washes for your kits. You can use them with a brush to darken the recesses of your model's panel lines, or you can airbrush them on and the wash acts like a filter, they do work quite well from the little I have used the couple of samples I received from Vallejo. I have the entire line of Washes arriving Monday as well as the new expanded colors in the Model Air line.
 

ExodusInside

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Feb 21, 2012
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I probably should have went a little more in depth with it.

I airbrushed a few pieces after thinning the paint ( just regular Vallejo model paint, not the airbrush kind ) and it came out kinda clumped. I used a two part paint one part thinner ratio, and I didn't buy Vallejo thinner... just using the thinner I already had which is still acrylic thinner but I guess each company designs their own thinner for their own line so maybe that had something to do with it?? But for sure I'll have to strip and try again. Thanks tho guys, and Elm City, that was quite informative, I'll have to see if I can find a store around here that has the Vallejo airbrushing paints...

Thanks for all the input guys. :D
 

Elm City Hobbies

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ExodusInside said:
I probably should have went a little more in depth with it.

I airbrushed a few pieces after thinning the paint ( just regular Vallejo model paint, not the airbrush kind ) and it came out kinda clumped. I used a two part paint one part thinner ratio, and I didn't buy Vallejo thinner... just using the thinner I already had which is still acrylic thinner but I guess each company designs their own thinner for their own line so maybe that had something to do with it?? But for sure I'll have to strip and try again. Thanks tho guys, and Elm City, that was quite informative, I'll have to see if I can find a store around here that has the Vallejo airbrushing paints...

Thanks for all the input guys. :D

Yes, depends on the thinner. Not all acrylics are the same, you have stuff like Tamiya, and Gunze that are alcohol based, and others like Life Color (not sure what their base is, but is isn't alcohol I don't think), and Vallejo which is actually an acrylic, vinyl, resin mix. And if you try and use an alcohol based thinner to thin it out....it is going to clump and gum up. Real PITA if it does it in your airbrush because it is a pain to clean.

Nothing wrong with thinning Vallejo Model color to airbrush, just have to have the right thinner to do so. Lots on my website! LOL
 

scaledale

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Nov 23, 2012
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I have a number of different types of thinners for enamels, acrylics and lacquers and if I'm not sure what base a paint is I test it before doing anything with it. I put a drop of the paint in question in each of the thinners to see how it reacts. If it gums up in the enamel thinner then it's usually lacquer. No matter what, it gives me a good idea what is going to happen before I start to mix for the airbrush. A little paint in a lot of thinner has a stronger reaction than a little thinner in a lot of paint.

Dale
 

netrangerx

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I built models for many years but have been out of it for a while. I have only ever used brushes and Testors enamel paints. I am working on a 1/72 Space Shuttle model that I have had in the box for years as my "comeback" project and want to paint it right. I am considering airbrushing and am looking for advice on what equipment is best for an AB newbie. Also, if I already have a compressor (the kind you use for nail guns) can it be used instead of buying a "hobby" compressor? Thanks.

Paul
 

Elm City Hobbies

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Hey there Paul,

Yes, you can use a nail gun compressor for airbrushing, as long as you can crank the airpressure down to 15-20lbs, you should be alright.

You might need a couple of fittings to convert it to your airbrush hose, but otherwise it is good to go. Used one for years until I got tired of it scaring the crap out of me (and usually ruining a paint job or at the very least spilling paint) when it kicked on. They are loud!
 

Drpepeprz

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Could someone make a thinning guide and pin it to this section? Or is it different for everyone?
 

Elm City Hobbies

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Generally different for each line of paint.

Lots of factors go into it. How much air pressure you are running, size of the needle in your airbrush, the type of effect you are looking for.

For me and the paints I use, or have used.

Tamiya: 50/50 paint to thinner (using Tamiya's own thinner)

Vallejo: Model Color: 3 parts Vallejo AB Thinner to 1 part Vallejo Model Color paint.
Model Air: Should be good to go out of the bottle, but Vallejo recommends a couple of drops in your paint cup.

Testors Enamel: 50/50 with enamel thinner

Lifecolor: I have used, but only once, and don't really remember the thinning ration, seem to remember that 50/50 was too much using their thinner.

Humbrol Enamel: 50/50 with enamel thinner

Gunze Acrylics: 50/50 with acrylic thinner

That covers the basics, and for the lines I have used for general use at about average pressure (15-20psi). Finer spray control you need to drop your air pressure more and thin your paint out a bit more.

And of course, practice on an old model or piece of scrap to try out your own recipes.
 

Elm City Hobbies

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Drpepeprz said:
Anyone uses acrylic on cars? or are laquers really the best?

I have done 2 cars with Vallejo.

http://public.fotki.com/ScottM/models/tamiya-mazda-rx-7-r1/

http://public.fotki.com/ScottM/models/model-king-darrell/

Works like a charm, but of course the Vallejo paints being mostly a Satin or Matt finish you do have to put a gloss varnish over the paint if you want some shine to it. Both of those above are glossed with just Future, however my next one I will be using Vallejo's Urethane Gloss to give it a try, which will be the funny car I have in the Shelf Queen group build.

Like any other paint going on, build up in layers.
 

barneyadi

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Jun 28, 2021
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Could someone point me in the direction of how to do the best paintbrush job, and the best brushes and paints to use?
 

wjbrandel

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Mar 4, 2021
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Personally I use a mix of paints: Army painter, testors, vallejo, and craft paints like americana and folk art. For brushes I actually use the multi pack brushes from various stores, I don't use the high end brushes because I tend to be hard on my brushes.
 

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