Trouble with panel liner/enamel thinner

the Baron

Ich bin ja, Herr, in Deiner Macht
Joined
May 12, 2009
Messages
1,312
Yeah, the seal coat helps. I use Future, and I use washes of water-based acrylics, and of oils and mineral spirits. I've never had any issue with the wash attacking the seal coat.

I also use pastel chalks, a cheap pack of chalk sticks I got at an art supply shop. I don't usually buy a product when I can make it myself.

I brush those on over my matte coat, and adjust as necessary, when the varnish knocks the color back a little. I also mix them with water and dishwashing liquid as others have described, to make a sludge. I like to use this to depict caked mud on an AFV or a MaK suit.
 

the Baron

Ich bin ja, Herr, in Deiner Macht
Joined
May 12, 2009
Messages
1,312
No I was not. I am pretty casual.
A primer will definitely help your color coats adhere, especially the first coats you lay down, and especially if you use acrylics.

Enamels and lacquers are hot enough that they can adhere to unprimed surfaces (though perhaps not as well as primed surfaces). Acrylics, generally, and especially water-based acrylics, don't bond to surfaces as well. So it's a good idea to use one, if you use acrylics for your color coats.

I like Tamiya's Fine Surface Primer, but I also use automotive primers and Rustoleum. Tamiya's primer is very finely-grained, while Rustoleum's and the automotive primers I've used are a little more coarsely-grained by comparison. But they all work well.

The only complaint I have with Rustoleum and the other brands is that I have gotten bad cans, whose vents clogged up-the hole in the top where the nozzle inserts. That left me with half a can of paint in the can, that I could not get out. That has never happened to me with Tamiya. And for a small can, it goes a long way.

I'm sure others will have their preferences, too, both regarding priming, and which primer to use. What I have written, is from my own experience. Your mileage may vary.
 

Jim62

Active Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
185
You are quite welcome. I have watched a few of that guys videos they are pretty good.
 

ohbejuan

New Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
27
A primer will definitely help your color coats adhere, especially the first coats you lay down, and especially if you use acrylics.

Enamels and lacquers are hot enough that they can adhere to unprimed surfaces (though perhaps not as well as primed surfaces). Acrylics, generally, and especially water-based acrylics, don't bond to surfaces as well. So it's a good idea to use one, if you use acrylics for your color coats.

I like Tamiya's Fine Surface Primer, but I also use automotive primers and Rustoleum. Tamiya's primer is very finely-grained, while Rustoleum's and the automotive primers I've used are a little more coarsely-grained by comparison. But they all work well.

The only complaint I have with Rustoleum and the other brands is that I have gotten bad cans, whose vents clogged up-the hole in the top where the nozzle inserts. That left me with half a can of paint in the can, that I could not get out. That has never happened to me with Tamiya. And for a small can, it goes a long way.

I'm sure others will have their preferences, too, both regarding priming, and which primer to use. What I have written, is from my own experience. Your mileage may vary.
I wil look into this. With the exception of spray sealants, I do everything by brush. but I may try this out. One limitation is no dedicated work space. When I spray the sealant I do it outside. I suppose I could do this outside as well.
 

the Baron

Ich bin ja, Herr, in Deiner Macht
Joined
May 12, 2009
Messages
1,312
my experience says Tamiya paints and washes only work properly with Tamiya thinners...
something in the science....
Yes, same here, specifically regarding the paints-I haven't used any commercially-prepared washes, Tamiya's or anyone else's.

I undertook a hero's journey with Tamiya paints, to get where I am today with them. When I started casting and painting toy soldiers back in the 90s, I bought paints as they were available, and for specific colors. I didn't mix any. So I wound up with a good collection of Tamiya acrylics in my Farbkastl. And I applied them by hand, albeit over a primer. I had the problems many report, especially that applying a second coat would lift off the first coat.

Then I got back into scale modeling, too. I used rattlecans for applying main color coats, but still used Tamiya's acrylics, applied by hand. I got myself an airbrush and started teaching myself to use it. And I read on some forum, that Tamiya's paints are formulated for airbrushing and so, are intended to be thinned for use. I don't know if that's the company's official position, but it made sense to me, given my experience with the paints.

So then I experimented with different thinners, more because Tamiya's thinner struck me as expensive for the small volume, and my Dutchy senses wouldn't let me spend so much, if there were cheaper alternatives. I tried water, because hey, "Acrylic means water-based!", right? (I learned that no, it doesn't). Still got the clumping, the paint lifting off. Then I tried isopropyl, because hey, Tamiya's acrylics are alcohol-based, right? Well, alcohols comprise a range of organic compounds, and I think Tamiya's acrylics use some other alcohol as a base. Isopropyl didn't work for me as a thinner for Tamiya acrylics. I still got clumping, and paint lifting. Though, it works very well to clean the brushes.

So I broke down, bought a bottle of Tamiya's proprietary thinner, and tried it. Immediately, the problems with hand-brushing went away. Airbrushing it became simple and consistent, too. I've gotten to the point where, with the paint properly thinned, I can lay down a coat on a piece, as thin as if I had airbrushed it.

The only drawback for me, is that I like to use a wet palette for my acrylics, and I can't do this with Tamiya's acrylics. So for hand-brushing, I use a small jar of the thinner. I'll either dip the brush in the jar, then touch it to the inside of the jar lid to pick up the paint, swirl it gently, then apply it to the piece. Or I pick up the color, then dip the brush in the thinner. Either way has worked well for me.

I don't use Tamiya's paints exclusively; I have other acrylics, such as water-based Andrea, Vallejo, Lifecolor, and craft-store brands. And I've got enamels, lacquers, and oils. But having solved the Riddle of Tamiya, I didn't have to struggle on with them or discard them.

And when someone posts, "You can't paint Tamiya acrylics by hand", I can offer my own experience to explain how it can work.
 

Latest posts

Top