Have you noticed that plastic scale models are a rather expensive hobby these days?

Steven

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Back in the late 60's when I first started building models, I had no sources available at the time to research any info on this subject. I also had no one else to learn from. I was on my own and learned on my own. Yet it came naturally to me and I had a relatively short learning curve. Enough to garner the attention of other kids who asked me to build their models. Today there is a plethora of info thanks to the internet where you can actually watch model builders in a step by step manner showing you their 'secrets'. It's become a tremendous platform that I never had as a kid. Youtube is filled to the brim with tutorials.
I use aftermarket parts in the same manner as I've used after market products for my 1970 Dodge Challenger for drag racing. It's all about improving the performance and appearance. If a model looks great, it has performed it's prime purpose. I enjoy using after market products as well as scratch building as I've been demonstrating in my Saturn V build. I've had to deal with runs and sags in my paint job. I won't accept those results so I sand them out and reshoot the paint until it's blemish free. That in effect is 'hiding' the mistakes I have made. I've sanded off panel lines made from pin striping tape and had to lay new tape down.
One can perceive the building environment as the garage for building an automobile or the pits where all the grunt work is done. The end result is a prime example of what performance is all about. You don't have to compete against others but rather yourself in striving for excellence. To become better than once upon a time ago. Use the resources you have available online today and begin the process of learning in a classroom type situation. There are good teachers out there waiting to teach people their art.
 
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SF_Ziggurat

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If you look at my Redstone build in the link I provided, you'll see where my changing primers and using aggressive tape to tape off the paint job got me into all kinds of trouble. The fact is we all make mistakes. It's the ones who learn from them who thrive. I hate repeating mistakes. So I had better learn from them. I've been building models for 50 years and still run into problems. BB King had stated something to the effect that a great guitarist knows how to cover up their mistakes. As far as your question is concerned, only you can answer that.
Well, looking at your posts in the Rocketry forum, your builds are at a level I can barely imagine. But I can certainly relate to making many, many mistakes with paint jobs, my weakest area by far. In fact, if I get a decent-looking paint job, I consider it something akin to a miracle. Everything from brand of paint, to weather conditions, plus my tendency to touch uncurled finishes, etc. But it is reassuring to see that even pros like you can have bad days!

I think one revelation I can take from this is it sounds like you and many other pros have been building models for many many years, and so have developed extremely advanced skill sets. I dropped model building for a couple of decades, and just picked it up again in retirement. So, I’m basically picking up, skill-wise, where I left off in my college days - and it shows!
 

SF_Ziggurat

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Sep 20, 2020
Messages
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Back in the late 60's when I first started building models, I had no sources available at the time to research any info on this subject. I also had no one else to learn from. I was on my own and learned on my own. Yet it came naturally to me and I had a relatively short learning curve. Enough to garner the attention of other kids who asked me to build their models. Today there is a plethora of info thanks to the internet where you can actually watch model builders in a step by step manner showing you their 'secrets'. It's become a tremendous platform that I never had as a kid. Youtube is filled to the brim with tutorials.
I use aftermarket parts in the same manner as I've used after market products for my 1970 Dodge Challenger for drag racing. It's all about improving the performance and appearance. If a model looks great, it has performed it's prime purpose. I enjoy using after market products as well as scratch building as I've been demonstrating in my Saturn V build. I've had to deal with runs and sags in my paint job. I won't accept those results so I sand them out and reshoot the paint until it's blemish free. That in effect is 'hiding' the mistakes I have made. I've sanded off panel lines made from pin striping tape and had to lay new tape down.
One can perceive the building environment as the garage for building an automobile or the pits where all the grunt work is done. The end result is a prime example of what performance is all about. You don't have to compete against others but rather yourself in striving for excellence. To become better than once upon a time ago. Use the resources you have available online today and begin the process of learning in a classroom type situation. There are good teachers out there waiting to teach people their art.
I agree with all of the above. It’s a personal achievement, above all, and in the end only you have to be satisfied with the result. And I have used so many internet resources to up my game, and this education has been essential.
 

SF_Ziggurat

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Sep 20, 2020
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I build out of the box, pretty much. But it takes me so long to finish something that I don't post very often.

I also have a short attention span for modeling-I start a kit with a lot of excitement, hit a snag of some kind, lose interest, and open a new kit. And I'll get the bug to work on something, then move on to something else than modeling. So I've got over a dozen builds on my Shelf of Doom.

Speaking of adding extra details as opposed to building out-of-box, one of those SoD builds is the USS Pennsylvania in 1/700, a conversion of HobbyBoss' Arizona kit. Not only did I try my hand at scratchbuilding the details that separated the Pennsy from her sister, it's my first time using PE for railing and some details. And that got me stuck. Also, the more I worked with the kit, the less I liked it. It's a great-nephew of Revell's old kit, copied by the Chinese, and it has all of the faults of that old kit. So, I haven't touched it in nearly 10 years. I think I have a build thread for it here in the forum.

Right now, since it's Christmas, I'm painting more figures for my Christmas display of "the Kaiser's Army/Berlin 1910". That goes under the tree. If I follow my pattern from the past couple of years, I'll get the bug right after New Year's and do a slam build of a Maschinen Krieger subject. They can be built and finished quickly.
It is good to hear there are others out there who are 1/ slow builders and 2/ have short attention spans! Guilty as charged. And when I realize how much time some of these pros put into their magnificent builds, it is very sobering. I decided long ago that as much as I want to ditch a project when I lose interest and/or hit a bad patch, I must finish it. But the time it takes me to even complete a rudimentary model is discouraging. I still have a touch of that teenage enthusiasm to rush through a model to see how “cool” it will look at the end. I still have to work on that.

I think in the new year I’m going to start posting some of my finished models here, just to see if anybody has some tips on areas to improve. They sure aren’t getting looked at sitting on the shelf.
 

SF_Ziggurat

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Sep 20, 2020
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Check this insane trip into model building. I know I could never achieve this level of patience, skills and determination. There's always someone better. http://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/Park.htm
Now THAT is model building! This artist (that’s really all you can call him) proves my theory that the hobby is accessible to everyone, from genius-level down to lowly kit assemblers such as myself. It’s what you put into it that translates into what you get out of it.
 

urumomo

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I like building things I can't build in 1:1 since most would require north of 33 million dollars ....
 

Steven

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The results in the end are what I strive for. It gives my hobbies a direction and a purpose. I use a methodical approach and plan to guide me in obtaining the results I'm capable of. The path can be arduous, frustrating and almost an impossible task to take on. I have bipolar II disorder. It's crippling when it hits. In spite of that, I have no intentions of letting this take me down entirely. I have always come back to continue my personal passions. I believe I have demonstrated this. I used to take the entire 7.5 ft. tall stack of the Saturn V to a local Starbucks for therapy.
It worked wonders even when I isolated myself for several months never stepping out of the house.

Ironically, I have adapted extremely well to the lockdown situation.. The only silver lining to being bipolar. My doctors were impressed in regards to developing my own form of therapy. It's been roughly 8-9 months since those visits. Today I dropped in to pick up a mint mocha. They were so happy to see me and I them. A warm welcome by all involved. Even that short stay felt so satisfying. A real connection was brought back. I could tell by their eyes they were smiling under their masks. I miss those interactions. So, when I can, I do what little I can on this project. It hasn't been easy. We have the dreary weather kin to the UK I believe. It can be depressing without the comfort of the sun. So one must choose their own ways of dealing with repression and depression.

I drum, drag race and build flying models. They occupy much of my time when possible. I also live in an environment that is peaceful, tranquil and beautiful. This is a deliberate, planned approach in dealing with adversity. It works. I highly recommend to anyone to strive for excellence. When you get there, you will have no doubt about it. It feels like you just climbed to the top of Everest. Just don't eat the yellow snow.
 
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Steven

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I have quit smoking, drinking and drugs back in '90 when I became a parent. I felt this would become the platform in showing a child who I was by becoming a living, breathing example for him. I raised him with chores to do as he had witnessed in myself. He did the dishes, cooked dinner, took out the garbage, helped us carry groceries in, mowed and weeded the yards, fixed plumbing, cleaned house including the bathroom as I did. In my mind it was not just a woman's job. She too had an exemplary career. It was in this 32 year committed relationship that I actually grew up. Putting aside my selfish partying days to transcend into a responsible, caring adult. It came naturally. Today I party, tomorrow I don't. It was that simple. Dealing with life's challenges has become routine. Understanding where one's priorities lie is more challenging. We don't want to let go of something we have enjoyed. When taking on one challenge after another, you become stronger as one does through weight lifting.

You now are less afraid of challenges and just dare them to come your way. I hate compromise. I won't cut off one arm to save the other. I like both of them. Two are always more useful. I want to have my cake and eat it whenever possible. I figure if I don't deserve it, who does? A nation and it's people will never reach it's goal of greatness until the individuals themselves achieve this in their own lives. When the 1% grows to 2%, 3%. And the 99% diminishes to 98%, 97%. Take on your own demons. Take them down hard. You will become stronger in mind, spirit and integrity. You will know when it happens.
 

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