Blackout Windows

TJBegin

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Joined
Jan 28, 2023
Messages
46
Ok, guys. I’m stumped again. I’m supposed to black out around these car model windows on the roughened surface . This feels like something that, after I try, I’m going to wish I hadn’t. Suggestions how to do this successfully?

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I would use liquid mask to protect the clear portion and airbrush it with a light coat of black acrylic . , a transparent black if it's not supposed to be completely opaque .
Any overspray that might get on the front side remove with a swab wetted with isopropyl alcohol .
 
Any recommendations on brand? I've not used this before and the reviews I see are pretty mixed on some brands.
 
Pack the brush with vaseline after you are finished -- it will break it down after 1/2 hour and allow easy removal from the bristles .
 
I've used Tamiya X-19 as well to tint windows. Just be careful and go in thin coats. Do not try to rush it by covering it all up at once with one thick one. It best to build up in several layers and letting it dry a bit in between if you have curved surfaces. Otherwise it might just pool up in the low spots if you have to much paint thinner as well
 
I've used Tamiya X-19 as well to tint windows. Just be careful and go in thin coats. Do not try to rush it by covering it all up at once with one thick one. It best to build up in several layers and letting it dry a bit in between if you have curved surfaces. Otherwise it might just pool up in the low spots if you have to much paint thinner as well
Agreed
 
I tried the liquid mask without much success then just used my paint pen on the front window. Leaned it over the edge of the window a tad and that made a wide enough mark to pretty much cover the blackout area. The edge was a handy guide to help keep it straight. Not too bad for a rookie.

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It’s kind of tricky to use, isn’t it. I need to work on my technique because I know I’ll use it for other applications.
 
It just takes some practice like everything else .
It doesn't want to stay where you put it sometimes , especially on raw plastic , but you just let what you have dry and then fill in any spots .
 
While I have your attention: when I remove plastic glass from the sprue (is that the right term?) it often cracks or kind of shatters at the contact point. I cut the connection with my blade until it’s loose enough to pull free. Is there a better technique to help me avoid the “collateral damage”?

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Cut it loose far away from the part at the start of the gate ,
the " gate " is the short , flat portion ,
then carefully remove the remainder of the gate with a sharp blade and sandpaper for the very last portion of it .

Use a sanding stick for the entire thing if you need to -- slightly slower but safer .
 
I’ve used liquid mask and I honestly do not like them - especially when doing liquid mask on aircraft canopies. Bought a bottle of one at a LHS - Vallejo brand since it was the only brand they had in stock. I now rarely use it. I prefer using Yellow Frog Painter Tape. Same tackiness as Tamiya tape but more economical. I also use their green painter tape and regular blue painter tape.
 

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