How to remove acrylic paint from a metal miniature?

urumomo

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You have nail polish remover on hand ?
It's probably straight acetone , but it's usually sold at a much higher unit cost than buying a can of acetone at the hardware store .
Kinda like buying those tiny bottles of enamel thinner from Testors over buying a can of mineral spirits at the hardware store .
I use ethyl acetate to solvent weld polystyrene , so it will definitely remove both resins .

Eagle-1 says that Super Clean removes all kinds of coatings , but like I said , I've never used the stuff .
It s sodium hydroxide ( lye ) , so it should do it .
Easy Off oven cleaner is the same ( sodium hydroxide ) , only it includes ethanol so it's more aggressive .
 

Eagle-1

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This will help me remove all paints, primer and varnish from my metal miniatures?

In no time. 9.00 bucks a gallon at Walmart. If these are metal, ACETONE will strip it in seconds and won't hurt it at all... 11.00 a gallon, also at Walmart. The Super Clean is for any plastics, but if this is all metal, acetone (nail polish remover WITH acetone will work) will do it very quickly.

EDITED TO ADD: DO NOT use ACETONE on plastic. If you do, you'll only do it once per model.
 

Little Cutie

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Acetone is what I use to remove paint, oil, and any other contaminates from wood or metal. It's much softer and safer than using lacquer thinner which is mainly MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone). This is hot and will burn your skin chemically. It's toxic to the nervous system and will make you sick when you breathe it in. It is definitely not a good idea to use indoors.

As for acetone it has a fast flash off rate and can be diluted or removed with water. Easy to use and cheap. It also removes superglue residue and softens plastics for plastic welding. I use it for a lot of things. I swear by it for the uses that I get from it. It won't hurt metal and it also won't tarnish. Just use a toothbrush to get into tiny crevices.
 

Stéphan

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Acetone is what I use to remove paint, oil, and any other contaminates from wood or metal. It's much softer and safer than using lacquer thinner which is mainly MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone). This is hot and will burn your skin chemically. It's toxic to the nervous system and will make you sick when you breathe it in. It is definitely not a good idea to use indoors.

As for acetone it has a fast flash off rate and can be diluted or removed with water. Easy to use and cheap. It also removes superglue residue and softens plastics for plastic welding. I use it for a lot of things. I swear by it for the uses that I get from it. It won't hurt metal and it also won't tarnish. Just use a toothbrush to get into tiny crevices.
Thanks. Can it removes also primer and matt varnish too because I have a few layers of each on my miniatures.

Are you using "Super Clean" product?
 

the Baron

Ich bin ja, Herr, in Deiner Macht
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Do you have a link where I can find this on Amazon?
I'll second SuperClean, it's an automotive degreaser. It's what I use.
I don't have a link for Amazon, but just search on "super clean" and you'll find it.
If you have an auto supply store in your area, or a Walmart (Walmart's in Canada, isn't it?) you should be able to walk in and pick up a jug. Here in the US, it's eight bucks and change for a gallon, or was, before the inflation hit.
An advantage of SuperClean is that you can use a batch of it over and over again, unlike other products. I use glass jars of various sizes, and fill them with SuperClean. I give the piece a soak in the jar. Within minutes, SC starts to soften the paint and it dissolves into the solution. The longer the soak, the more the paint dissolves. I usually soak metal figures for around 5 minutes, then remove them and use an old toothbrush to scrub away gently remaining paint.
I use SC to remove paint from styrene and resin pieces, too. I have had no problems with it.
Hope that helps!
 

ulvdemon

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I use Simple Green to remove Vallejo paints. Just need to let it soak and use an old tooth brush to scrub off the paint. it also has the added benefit of being pretty harmless to the skin.
 

Elm City Hobbies

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Super Clean won't touch Vallejo Primer.
About the only thing that will take it off is 99% rubbing alcohol, and then you will have to scrub on it, once it has the paint softened.
When Vallejo primer cures, it is pretty much like a rock.
 

Marktastrophe

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When Vallejo primer cures, it is pretty much like a rock.
Could this be interpreted as if you lay down your primer, and fudge up, Super Clean will strip it if you start soaking it within an hour? (Less?)
I have one clear example of Vallejo primer not coming up... I honestly can't recall trying to strip anything else primed with Vallejo primer.
 

Little Cutie

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Thanks. Can it removes also primer and matt varnish too because I have a few layers of each on my miniatures.

Are you using "Super Clean" product?
I haven't used Super Clean but I have heard that it does wonders for plastic models in removing paint. I have used Purple Power and it's worthless! I can't get anything to come off with any real success using it. However I have heard that Easy - Off oven cleaner also works great in removing old paint but I haven't tried it either. I know that acetone is readily available at most stores and automotive outlets and paint jobbers. It's mainly available in European nations except where it is restricted. It eats everything from Bondo (automotive body filler), to very soft plastics if left in it and it mars the surfaces of many things. It will remove primer, paint, lacquer, shellac, varnish, acrylics of all kinds, enamel, and wood filler. You can use paint stripper if nothing else appeals to you. The only thing I suggest is outdoors in good ventilation and wear gloves. I use natural brushes or cheap throw away brushes or even cheap toothbrushes will help to remove from small areas and crevices. You might want to wear safety goggles when scrubbing with a brush that that you don't get chemicals in your eyes no matter what you choose to remove paint with. Water washes away paint stripper too. Just a few options at your disposal.

Acetone will also remove oil based paints as well. I am guessing that when you say metal that you are referring to lead miniatures?
 

Elm City Hobbies

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Could this be interpreted as if you lay down your primer, and fudge up, Super Clean will strip it if you start soaking it within an hour? (Less?)
I have one clear example of Vallejo primer not coming up... I honestly can't recall trying to strip anything else primed with Vallejo primer.
If it was freshly painted and not cured yet, say under 48hrs, then Super Clean might loosen up, but once it is cured, the only thing that is moving it is the 99%IPA, and even then you are probably going to have to scrub at it.
 

the Baron

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If it was freshly painted and not cured yet, say under 48hrs, then Super Clean might loosen up, but once it is cured, the only thing that is moving it is the 99%IPA, and even then you are probably going to have to scrub at it.
I use SC to strip paint from old figures that I buy off eBay or at shows. The paint on those items is definitely cured. It may take a longer soak to soften or dissolve the paint, but it definitely works.
 
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