Aoshima Super Oversize Thunderbird 2 WIP

rastanz

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Another Gerry Anderson themed kit on the work bench, the Aoshima non-scale Super Oversize Thunderbird 2.

After doing a dry fit, it measures 13" in length (nose to tail), 10" wide (wing tip to wing tip) and 3.5" in height (base to top of tailplane), with that being said, the kit is a real dog of a kit, misalignment's all over, fit issues, seams the size of the grand canyon, sink marks the depth of san andreas fault just to name a few.

My approach to this will be focused on fixing most of the exterior details as the pod will be in a fix position inside the main fuselage which presents problems in itself.

The pod is held in place simply by pressure from the forward and rear sections of the main fuselage which are slightly tapered inward, the fit is tight and a bit on the worrisome side because of this vice grip like pressure when the pod is in place it creates warping of the main fuselage causing misalignment's of the little nub inserts, it raises the question how difficult the pod would be to mount after it's been painted.

First photo's show the gap between the side of the pod and the twin-boom fuselage and the sink mark pits.



The lower part of the pod has openings for wheels? yes, I guess it's suppose to be a toy. I'll fill them in with some styrene.



And then there's the raised detail of the numbers on the tail piece's, the wings and above and below the cockpit.



Easily solved simply by sanding it away and rescribing in the panel lines



I turned my attention to the cockpit, firstly by sanding away the raised number 2.

The cockpit windows are set too high and too large on the forward fuselage so I filled in the top quarters with a bit of styrene strip and putty, I'll work on this area a little more and add a second thin layer of putty.

Filled in the noticeably large sink pit along one side of the pod.



I've started the time consuming task of sanding away the inner sections to relieve some of the stress and even sanding the pod itself which is slowly starting to become much easier to mount with less force.

The pod fit is misaligned, there's a noticeable 'step' along the sides when the top and lower halves are in place, it seems the top half is about a millimetre narrower than the bottom half.

Tried a couple of techniques with each of them failing, the warm water trick and heat gun treatment only heated the areas and since the upper half is a solid piece of plastic, it wouldn't keep it's modified position and kept returning to it's original shape.

The misalignment is only around the middle section of the pod so I used a couple of piece's of wooden dowels acting like braces mounted on the inside to push the wall of the pods to the same width of the lower half.

I had to be careful that I didn't add to any further warpage to both the pod and the main fuselage and it would still be easy to mount.



The dowels worked out fine and the pins now line up. Still a ton of work to be done on this mostly all to do with alignment.

Scratch built some replacement intakes, the originals have holes in them for firing missiles, ummm, yeah, I think it was a random addon to further enhance the toyish factor of the kit? but anyway, GONE are those silly things :p



The kit has presented a nice challenge for me for it is riddled with little surprises... well, back to sanding.
 
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rastanz

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Small update:

My original plan was to fix the pod in place but scrapped that because I needed somewhere to stash the battery for the lighting and the only ideal place I could think of was in behind the cockpit, so I decided to make the pod removable.

Revisited some earlier work, the first pair of intakes I made were taken from the measurements and details of the original kit part, after stepping back and looking at both my reference and my work I decided to redo them as they didn't fill the area to my liking and the area looked too bare.

Top = copy of kit part
Middle = original kit part
Bottom = redone



I've cut out a section of the cockpit as that is where I will fix the electronics, battery holder and the on/off switch, I also cut away a section of the rear wall to add some detailing. Not going for anything fancy, just some basic lighting.

Patched up the hole on the bottom half of the pod which is still wip.




Cut out and narrowed the cockpit windows as the original windows looked too big, the narrower windows make the model look more in scale and cut open the lower observation windows.

Still lots of puttying and sanding to be done plus since I opened up the windows, I'll need to scratch build the cockpit interior.



Slow moving as I've had to put a lot of thought into the adjustments since fixing one thing messes up another... this kit is a son of a bish.
 
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SF_Ziggurat

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Howdy! New to the forums, and I went right to the Sci-Fi section, as vintage SF is my thing. I was so happy to see someone building the legendary Thunderbird 2! A good many of the Japanese SF kits, as you mentioned, were designed to be little more than unassembled toys, and as such, I wish you luck in your Herculean task of trying to “fix” this beautiful toy! I built the smaller Imai TB 2 model back in the 1960s, and thought the big rubber wheels on the bottom of the Pod were absolutely hilarious!
 
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rastanz

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Excellent !
Thanks mate, it's slow moving but getting there :)

Howdy! New to the forums, and I went right to the Sci-Fi section, as vintage SF is my thing. I was so happy to see someone building the legendary Thunderbird 2! A good many of the Japanese SF kits, as you mentioned, were designed to be little more than unassembled toys, and as such, I wish you luck in your Herculean task of trying to “fix” this beautiful toy! I built the smaller Imai TB 2 model back in the 1960s, and thought the big rubber wheels on the bottom of the Pod were absolutely hilarious!
Hi Ziggurat and welcome to the forums, nice of you to pop by and share a few words of your Imai TB2.

I thought I'd give myself a bit of a challenge with this kit and offer it a little TLC as I've read a lot of negative reviews about it. The kit is a nice size and will make a nice display piece on my shelf, those big rubber wheels are indeed hilarious :D

Nice work so far, I'll be following your build, I loved this show as a kid !
Thanks, also a fav show of mine as a kid.

Small update:

Been working on building some of the inner details, I completed the main cockpit area and I think I got the scale right to suit the windows which I heightened just a little more.

I use reference photo's from the De Agostini 1/144 scale version as they displayed all the angles I needed to help with scratch building the cockpit as well as the forward and rear wall panels.

It's not highly detailed as I just wanted a space filler.



The rear wall panel will be fixed position but I had to get a little inventive with the forward panel as I wanted to house the 9 volt power source behind the wall of the cockpit, so the forward panel had to be removable.

Using a sheet of styrene, I cut out two small tabs then drilled a hole in each just big enough for a tiny neodymium magnet to sit inside, I glued one tab to the cockpit section and the other to the backside of the wall panel.

It worked out okay and plops in place nice and solid, just as long as I have access to the battery and switch, I'm happy.

Oh yeah, about the switch being internal, I kinda puttied up all the holes including the one for the switch for I didn't want it to be seen poking out anywhere on the exterior.





Can't really seal this up yet as I need to paint the cockpit and install the lighting which is still on it's way to me in the post.

Cheers :cool:
 

urumomo

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Dang , man - that's awesome work with those bulkheads and the cockpit is fantastic !
 

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